Diocesan Advisory Committee And Historic Churches

The Diocesan Advisory Committee (the DAC) is a statutory diocesan committee appointed by the Bishop. It offers advice to Parochial Church Councils (PCCs) and the Chancellor of the Diocese and Archdeacons, in relation to proposed works and matters affecting church buildings, their contents and churchyards, having due regard to the role of a church as a local centre of worship and mission. It also advises on the care and development of church buildings more generally.

One of its main roles is in advising the Chancellor of the Diocese and Archdeacons in relation to applications for Faculties and List B permissions to authorise works and matters affecting church buildings, their contents and churchyards. The final decision in relation to faculty applications lies with the Diocesan Chancellor.

The DAC is made up of members from a range of backgrounds, appointed for their knowledge and expertise in the care and use of church buildings. These include architects/surveyors, priests and laity, conservation, archaeology and architectural history professionals and those with knowledge in relation to organs, building works and project management. They also include nominees from Historic England, the National Amenity Societies and Local Authorities.

The work of the DAC is also supported by a number of specialist advisors. Members and advisors undertake their work for the DAC on a voluntary basis.

The work of the DAC is facilitated by the DAC Secretary who can be contacted here for information and advice in relation to church buildings works, alterations to the fabric of the church building, the permissions processes and obtaining advice from the DAC.

Team 

Sally van der Sterren

DAC SECRETARY
 
 Email Sally van der Sterren
 01733 887026
 
Historic Churches Officer

Jon Breckon

HISTORIC CHURCHES SUPPORT OFFICER
 
 Email Jon Breckon
 07732 894457
 

 

Diocesan Advisory Committee

Churches, Churchyards, the DAC and  Permissions Processes

Find out more about the management of churches and churchyards, and the work of the Diocesan Advisory Committee (DAC) and Faculty Jurisdiction and the permissions process.

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Faculty Jurisdictions

A list of current Faculty applications relating to Grade I and II* listed churches.

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The Diocesan Registry

For information in relation to legal matters, the management of church buildings and churchyards, memorials and chancel repairs, Faculty Jurisdiction and the necessary permissions required for matters affecting consecrated buildings and burial grounds in the diocese, please visit the Peterborough Diocesan Registry website.

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Complaints Procedure

The procedure to make a complaint about a Chancellor can be found here.

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Guidance Notes

Guidance notes in relation to matters affecting your church building and churchyard.

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Environmental Issues

There is a good deal of national information in relation to the environment and working towards Net Zero Carbon here.

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and local diocesan information can be found here

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Quinquennial Inspection

The diocese offers a grant of £312 as a contribution towards the cost of the quinquennial inspection of its churches.

Where the parish concerned has already paid its parish share, the grant will be paid to the PCC. Where a parish has not yet completed its parish share payment for the year, an amount equivalent to the grant will be deducted from the parish share still owing. To apply, please send a copy of the quinquennial inspector’s invoice, with a covering email requesting the grant, to:

Sally van der Sterren

Church Major Works Fund

The Church Major Works Fund exists to help parishes undertaking major church building projects, by providing loans to assist with cashflow over the project lifetime. Funds are limited, and so parishes applying for support must be able to demonstrate an urgent need, and also that steps are being taken to raise the necessary funding for the project. 

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Historic Churches

Grants & Fundraising

Grants are one of the key means of funding church building projects. They are available for a great variety of purposes, including repairs to the fabric of the building, specialist conservation work for bells or wall paintings, developing cultural, social and educational projects, or for alterations that will open up a church building for wider use.

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Maintenance & Metal Theft

Regular maintenance is a key part of caring for a church building. It can help you to save money and headaches through spotting potential problems early before they become serious issues.

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Case Studies & Resources

To include a small selection of case studies, prepared by the Historic Churches Support Officer, highlighting good examples of repair projects, reordering or community projects; photos before and after; serveries; wc’s; churchyard ecology

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